Regulated Designations

Being a Registrant with a designation carries responsibility, authority and recognition. Regulated agrology professionals in British Columbia use a title, also known as a designation:

  • An Articling Agrologist (AAg) must meet mandatory education requirements and be approved for registration by the Credentials Committee. Upon successful completion of the Articling Program, the AAg is eligible to become a PAg.
  • An Articling Technical Agrologist (ATAg) must meet mandatory education requirements and be approved for registration by the Credentials Committee. Upon successful completion of the Articling Program, the ATAg is eligible to become a TAg.
  • A Professional Agrologist (PAg) has already completed the Articling Program and has at least two years of agrology-related work experience after their first eligible degree. A PAg can use their professional seal on documents.
  • A Technical Agrologist (TAg) has completed the Articling Program and has at least two years of agrology-related work experience after their first eligible diploma, applied degree, or degree. A TAg can use their professional seal on documents.

The PAg and TAg designations are both authorized to sign professional work provided it is in their areas of specialization. Professional designations command a higher wage and may give an edge over less qualified individuals when competing for employment or clients.

Restricted Scope of Practice For (Articling) Technical Agrologists

(Articling) Technical Agrologists may practice independently (i.e. without Professional Agrologist supervision) with a restricted scope of practice. The limited scope of practice allows the technical agrologist to collect data, operate equipment, and make recommendations to other professionals; however, it prevents them from advising, interpreting, or recommending in situations where they may present a risk to the public. The functions of a Technical Agrologist are more narrowly defined and typically more focused on technical parameters, guidelines, and protocols. The responsibilities of a Professional Agrologist generally are broader and have a full-scale understanding of the project.